Brew the most delicious coffee at home with this stylish brewing method!

Guest article by Elisah Jacobs (Interior Junkie)

I'm sure it comes as no surprise when I say that I love coffee. I was taught how to enjoy the drink by my grandmother back when I was as a teenager. She let me make coffee over at her place every week, in the old-fashioned way: grind the beans, put the kettle on the stove, put the coffee in a filter and pour! Recently I tried out a brewing method using HARIO's V60 Glass Dripper ー which by the way fits in beautifully in our kitchen thanks to its minimalist design.

I had known about this Japanese brand for a long time, as I often would spot their products when visiting friends. The last time I visited my family-in-law I was even served a coffee brewed with HARIO's V60 brewing method. The brand kept popping up in my life without me even realizing it. So I was very happy to get the opportunity to do this shoot with my very own V60 set!
As with every other coffee brewing method, you will need to test for yourself what ratio of water/beans you think tastes best. Here you'll find my step-by-step method for brewing a delicious cup of coffee using HARIO's V60 Glass Dripper.

STEP 1: GRIND THE BEANS

The best cups of coffee are of course brewed with freshly ground beans. No coffee capsule or pre-ground bean can compete with that. It does take a bit more time of course, so it's understandable that a lot of people go for the easy and ready-to-go options; I'm the same!
Having said that, I really enjoyed bringing out the coffee connoisseur in me by using a hand-grinder to manually grind my coffee beans. Just the fragrance alone is a treat and gets you excited for your upcoming cup. I make sure to use 24 grams of ground beans for one big cup (or two small cups) of coffee.

STEP 2: WET THE FILTER WITH HOT WATER

This step not only ensures that the paper filter properly sticks to the dripper, but also to improve the taste of the coffee. After wetting the filter, remove the water from the server and add the coffee to the wet filter.

STEP 3: BOIL WATER, BLOOM AND POUR

The ideal temperature for this way of brewing coffee is between 85 and 90 degrees Celcius. I went with the latter, as I like to have my drink hot. For my 24 grams of coffee, I use 300 mililiters of water. Whether or not this is a good ratio for you is up to you to find out!
Pour a little bit of water into the filter and wait for 30 seconds. This process is called the 'bloom', and alows the coffee's aromas to be released. After that, pour until the coffee is slightly under water. Make sure that there is always water in the filter in between your pours. Repeat this process until you've poured all the water. For the best taste, it's not necessary to use the last bit of water in the filter, so remove the filter when there's only a little bit of water left.

STEP 4: ENJOY YOUR COFFEE

Hurray! Your coffee is done! The only thing left to do is serve, sip and enjoy your brew. Oh, and don't forget to pair it with a piece of chocolate (or two, or three...)!

IN CONCLUSION

This brewing method really made me feel like a barista.
I had a lot of fun making my coffee, even if these brewing methods are a bit different from how my grandmother used to do it. But that didn't stop me from having flashbacks to pouring hot water in front of her stove back in the day.
The coffee made with my French press and percolator may have a slightly stronger flavour, but the coffee I made with my V60 came out very soft and smooth. Or, to describe it like a wine: a full, rounded taste!
The HARIO V60 is a beautiful addition to my collection of coffee appliances. And - not unimportant - it looks great in our home. In other words, this one's a keeper!

HAS THIS GOTTEN YOU ALL FIRED UP TO TRY TO BREW YOUR OWN DELICIOUS COFFEE?

Take a look at HARIO's range of range of products here! Besides the Simply HARIO V60 Glass Dripper set, they also have gorgeous tea drippers, kettles and much more!
I'm very curious to hear what methods and recipes you use to make your coffee...

Translated and edited from the original Dutch article here.
All pictures by Interior Junkie.

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